Conflict Resolution

Advanced Problem-Solving Strategies

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A variation of the Prisoners’ Dilemma problem may be playing out in the Republican primary campaign. Those elements in the party who are still seeking to prevent Trump from becoming the nominee have apparently abandoned their original tactic of attempting to coalesce support around the strongest non-Trump candidate while encouraging weaker candidates to drop out. Instead, the plan of the Never Trump movement is now to encourage all three remaining candidates to remain in the race, but act more cooperatively toward each other so that each can amass the maximum number of delegates in the states in which each is running most strongly, and thereby prevent Trump from gaining a majority in advance of the convention. Thus, Rubio and Cruz […]

In my last post on the topic of how we initiate conflict resolution, I talked about how lawyers frame disputes in a way that may leave out some of the most important concerns of the parties. But the blame for turning a multi-faceted conflict into a contest over legal issues does not lie solely with narrow-minded or selfish lawyers. The parties also bear some responsibility for viewing their dispute in that way. Most new or potential clients walk into a lawyer’s office looking for vindication. They want to talk about the merits right away. They want to know which side is right, and which side is at fault. Since most clients are pre-disposed to believe they are in the right, […]

About halfway through the new movie Woman in Gold–which tells the story of Maria Altmann’s lengthy legal battle to recover the famous Klimt painting of her aunt from the Austrian government–the parties try to resolve the dispute by mediation. At the mediation, Altmann (played by Helen Mirren) offers to allow the Austrians to keep the painting if they will only acknowledge that it was stolen property (looted from her family by the Nazis), and pay some amount in compensation. It was a framework for negotiations that most mediators would jump at, because if the framework were accepted by the other side, the only thing left to negotiate would have been the amount of compensation. But the Austrian representative refuses even to consider […]

So last night the Dodgers dropped the final game of the NL division series to the Cardinals, who have now blocked the Dodgers two years in a row from attaining their World Series goal. And what I’m reading in today’s paper is about who to blame for the loss. Here is a team that set out to spend whatever it took and do whatever was necessary to get to the championship, and yet they came up short once again. It’s hard not to want to blame somebody in the organization in that situation. If you were willing to do anything to win, and yet you failed to win, there must have been something you did wrong, right? Certainly there is no […]

A recent case from the Court of Appeal in Florida illustrates the perils of confidentiality clauses in settlement agreements, but something more as well. Patrick Snay brought an age discrimination suit against a private school that did not renew his contract as headmaster, and settled the case for $80,000 plus $60,000 in attorneys’ fees. (According to footnote 5 of the opinion, it appears the settlement was accomplished by mediation.) So far, so good. The settlement agreement contained a strict confidentiality clause prohibiting the plaintiff from disclosing, directly or indirectly, any information whatsoever about the existence or terms of the agreement to anyone except professional advisers. But Snay’s daughter, who was a student at the school, and apparently had also suffered […]