Conflict Resolution

Advanced Problem-Solving Strategies

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How do we know whether those with whom we are dealing have hostile intentions? How do we establish communication with them? How do we develop trust? The new science fiction movie Arrival addresses these common problems in conflict resolution. Confronted by forces that appear new and dangerous, our human instincts urge us to fight or flight. Those instincts may also lead us to interpret ambiguous gestures in a threatening way. We face these challenges even when we are dealing with people we know who are speaking our language. Imagine being confronted by an alien race that communicates with symbols we have no key to interpret. The movie nicely illustrates the linguistic complexities involved in asking a simple question like, “What is […]

On Sunday voters in Colombia surprisingly rejected a peace agreement that took the parties years to negotiate. The agreement would have ended more than 50 years of a civil war  that has pitted the government against the rebel FARC army. This setback for the cause of peace comes the same week that Israel buried Shimon Peres, one of the country’s great peacemakers, the same month when a hard-won ceasefire in Syria seems to have collapsed, the same year that the United Kingdom voted to pull out of the EU treaty that has helped keep the peace in Europe for a generation, and the same year that has seen the growth around the world of nationalist movements, and of fears of […]

Tunisia, where the Arab Spring started, is also the first country to emerge from its revolution with a genuine commitment to democracy and the rule of law. This outcome may be attributable in large part to the work of the National Dialogue Quartet, a group composed of four organizations: the General Labor Union; the Tunisian Confederation of Industry, Trade and Handicrafts; the Tunisian Human Rights League; and the Tunisian Order of Lawyers. When Tunisia appeared in danger of falling into civil war, these organizations banded together and persuaded the Islamist and other parties to agree to a framework for negotiations that would lead to a more legitimate and pluralistic government. The quartet’s work illustrates two techniques favored by mediators: (1) acceptance […]

The ink is barely dry on the breakthrough agreement reached this week with Iran, requiring that country to eliminate most of its nuclear weapons capacity in exchange for the lifting of economic sanctions, and many critics are already out in full force decrying the agreement. It seems remarkable that they could be so sure of their opposition without having had much time to read or study the text, or consider carefully whether this deal is better than the alternative of continued conflict. (In previous posts–here and here–on this topic, I outlined the way in which I think any negotiated agreement should be evaluated, not by comparing it to the outcome each side would have preferred, but instead by comparing it […]

Here is Secretary of State John Kerry reporting on the progress of negotiations with Iran. His statement should sound familiar to a lot of mediators: on continuing negotiations so long as progress is being made, on the importance of building an agreement that will last, on the need to avoid being rushed or constrained by arbitrary deadlines, and at the same time on recognizing that difficult decisions need to be made soon if agreement is to be reached.