Conflict Resolution

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Even if there hadn’t been a movie making this whole story famous, those of us concerned with the law and mediation might still follow the saga of the lawsuit between Mark Zuckerberg and the Winklevosses with interest.  Yesterday the twins were dealt a setback in their efforts to overturn a settlement they claim was fraudulently induced. Here is the Ninth Circuit opinion’s description of that settlement agreement: Affter a day of negotiations, ConnectU, Facebook and the Winklevosses signed a handwritten, one-and-a-third page “Term Sheet & Settlement Agreement” (the Settlement Agreement). The Winklevosses agreed to give up ConnectU in exchange for cash and a piece of Facebook. The parties stipulated that the Settlement Agreement was “confidential,” “binding” and “may be submitted […]

Justice Scalia is known for his theory of interpreting the Constitution by reference solely to the text in light of the meaning that the drafters supposedly intended at the time they wrote it. In his book A Matter of Interpretation, Scalia has defended his approach as follows: Of all the criticisms leveled against textualism, the most mindless is that it is formalist. The answer to that is, of course it’s formalistic! The rule of law is about form . . . A murderer has been caught with blood on his hands, bending over the body of his victim; a neighbor with a video camera has filmed the crime and the murderer has confessed in writing and on videotape. We nonetheless insist that before the […]

We can trace our justice system back to Moses receiving the Ten Commandments, or Hammurabi’s Code (1700 BCE), if we wish. I’d prefer to start with Aeschylus’s Oresteia, from 458 BCE.  I decided to reread this ancient three part Greek tragedy about the origins of a new concept of justice, to see if it might shed some light on transitions that seem to be occurring in our modern legal system.  Readers might have to bear with me for a few blog posts before I reach that goal. In Agamemnon, the first play of the Oresteia trilogy, Aeschylus tells the story of Agamemnon’s homecoming and murder.  Agamemnon has been away for ten years fighting the Trojan War.  In the meantime, not […]

One of the more interesting courses I took in law school was International Law, which is not a course that everyone takes, because it does not appear to offer much practical value for most lawyers’ careers.  I didn’t see much practical value in it either when I signed up, but found that it got me thinking about the law in a much different way from other law school courses.   What you learn when you study international law is that the system of international law is for the most part not structured as a body of statutes enacted by legislatures, or precedents handed down by judges.  International law is mostly not enforced by police, or by fines, or by prison.  Because […]

I posted comments on my litigation blog on a report issued this spring by the American College of Trial Lawyers Task Force on Discovery and the Institute for the Advancement of the American Legal System, which recommends a number of reforms of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, chiefly concerning limitations on discovery. This same report gives but a passing nod to alternative dispute resolution. (pp.21-22) The trial lawyers who produced this report are willing to consider what they themselves describe as “radical” changes to the discovery rules, as well as numerous other reforms. Yet, while they recognize the value of mediation, their support for it is lukewarm at best. Although the report recommends that courts raise the possibility of […]