Conflict Resolution

Advanced Problem-Solving Strategies

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There is a measure on the March ballot in Los Angeles, Measure S, that would among other things force a two year moratorium on most new big real estate development projects in the city. I’m not going to discuss here the merits of this proposal, even though I have definite opinions on the topic. I’m only going to address how our political and legal processes frame decisions. In this case, instead of allowing a healthy public debate over the scale, density and location of new apartment construction, in which we could consider a range of ideas, and perhaps reach solutions that serve a number of competing interests, this ballot initiative now forces use to choose only whether we are for […]

Dorit Cypis put together an interesting workshop at the SCMA conference this past weekend, in which participants explored the power of forming small groups to engage in dialogue. This format has been used successfully in a number of contexts to allow different points of view in a community to be expressed and understood. (See my post below on the Days of Dialogue programs on the future of policing.) It works because the participants in these groups learn to see one another as human beings They feel safe in telling their stories and expressing their feelings because they are taught to listen respectfully when other members of the group do the same. The topic in our small groups at this conference was […]

Someone renting the house across the street from us has been blasting loud music very late at night, and I’ve been wondering how to deal with it. The other night when he woke us up at 2 am, I wanted to go knock on his door, but I was afraid that might cause an ugly confrontation. Should I call the cops? Should I leave a note in his mailbox? I participated as a facilitator last night in another of the Days of Dialogue sessions being held around the city this year, on the very timely topic of the future of policing. One of the subjects my table discussed was fear: for example the fear claimed by police officers who have […]

Streetsblog There is a half-finished Target store in my neighborhood that stands as a perfect metaphor for the problems with using litigation as a means of resolving developers’ and the community’s interests in urban projects. With construction halted because of claimed height violations, the unfinished building has been left in limbo. The community now has to live with something that is ugly; that is enormously wasteful; and that has been sitting there unfinished for a long time. Its continued unresolved status satisfies neither those opposed nor those in favor of the project. I used that metaphor while introducing one of the workshops at the SCMA fall conference yesterday, a workshop on urban projects organized by Noah Stein. The panel brought […]

An ongoing contentious conflict in Los Angeles, that affects every resident, is the conflict between automobile drivers and other users of the city’s public spaces. This city, which has been designed in deference to the automobile since the 1920’s, is facing new challenges from pedestrian, bicycle and public transit advocates seeking to reclaim a larger share of the city streets. Surprisingly, and without much public attention, this car-centric city has already adopted a new policy giving substantial ground to these advocates. By a 12-2 vote, the City Council recently adopted what is called the Mobility Plan 2035, which calls, among other things, for putting many city streets on a “road diet” to allow more room for bicycle lanes and sidewalks. A few […]