Conflict Resolution

Advanced Problem-Solving Strategies

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More evidence that the practice of law has changed in fundamental ways: At a panel presentation this week at the SCMA Employment Mediation Institute, Ann Kotlarski, who represents employers and Curt Surls, who represents employees, both agreed that they prefer to resolve employer-employee disputes without litigation if possible. Surls said that he always sends detailed demand letters setting forth the factual background his client has presented, as well as the legal basis for his client’s claims, before filing a complaint. These letters usually do not contain specific monetary demands, but  do include an invitation to mediate the dispute. Kotlarski also initiates attempts at early dispute resolution. She always calls the plaintiff’s attorney as soon as she gets a complaint or […]

Here is how one high stakes negotiation is currently playing out: First a recap. On February 13, 2016, Justice Scalia’s unexpected death created a vacancy on the Supreme Court. Within less than a day, leading Senate Republicans made a pre-emptive opening demand, announcing that they would refuse to consider, even to hold hearings for, any nominee the president proposed.  Next, President Obama announced that he would proceed in the normal course anyway, and he also invited the opposition to the White House, where they meet in the Oval Office on March 1, 2016. Presumably the parties gauged each other’s resolve, presented their respective best alternatives to a negotiated outcome of the dispute, perhaps suggested some ways of reaching a resolution. […]

A variation of the Prisoners’ Dilemma problem may be playing out in the Republican primary campaign. Those elements in the party who are still seeking to prevent Trump from becoming the nominee have apparently abandoned their original tactic of attempting to coalesce support around the strongest non-Trump candidate while encouraging weaker candidates to drop out. Instead, the plan of the Never Trump movement is now to encourage all three remaining candidates to remain in the race, but act more cooperatively toward each other so that each can amass the maximum number of delegates in the states in which each is running most strongly, and thereby prevent Trump from gaining a majority in advance of the convention. Thus, Rubio and Cruz […]

Neutrality is a cherished concept in mediation, but the term is interpreted differently by different mediators. Some take it to mean being strictly impartial and fair toward both sides in a dispute, in the way that a judge should not let his or her biases affect the outcome, or show favoritism toward one side or the other. I take it to mean being indifferent toward the outcome of the process, leaving the parties to achieve a resolution acceptable to each side, but assisting both sides in satisfying their interests to the greatest extent possible. To do that mediators play a different role than judges or arbitrators, at times coaching one side or the other on their negotiating tactics, and at […]

Are there negotiating lessons one can learn from the world of Quentin Tarantino? Mediators tend to believe that if we encourage parties in conflict to continue talking even when resolution seems unlikely, they will eventually reach a level of common understanding that will enable both sides to find an acceptable way out of conflict. Films like The Hateful Eight and most other Tarantino films, severely test that assumption. The characters jabber endlessly. They examine each problem in excruciating detail. They lay out all of the various scenarios for escape from their predicament (their best alternatives to a violent outcome). At one point in The Hateful Eight, a character is jumping to conclusions about which of the three guys lined up against […]