Conflict Resolution

Advanced Problem-Solving Strategies

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The ABA Dispute Resolution conference, held this year in New York City, presents an interesting mix of programs on mediation, arbitration, negotiation and collaborative practice. The conference manages to combine these fields, even though the cultures of mediation and arbitration don’t always mesh very well; in fact they sometimes seem like opposites. But practitioners in both fields seem to get along. What they have in common is the desire to avoid litigation. Having a common enemy makes friends of us all. Thus, at one of the panels I attended, in-house counsel acknowledged that they require employees to sign arbitration clauses so that the company can avoid the burden and expense of class action lawsuits. Mediation or arbitration of employment disputes […]

A couple of recent experiences as a consumer of mediation services have made me wonder whether the practice is living up to its full potential. In one case, when the mediator and opposing counsel started talking about what was going to happen at trial, I told them that there was no way the case was going to trial. They already knew I had done my best to avoid engaging in motion practice, discovery or other forms of litigation activity, and they also knew that the cost of taking the case to trial would almost certainly exceed the amount in controversy, and that my clients probably couldn’t afford it. Therefore I didn’t see much point in talking about what was likely […]

An ongoing contentious conflict in Los Angeles, that affects every resident, is the conflict between automobile drivers and other users of the city’s public spaces. This city, which has been designed in deference to the automobile since the 1920’s, is facing new challenges from pedestrian, bicycle and public transit advocates seeking to reclaim a larger share of the city streets. Surprisingly, and without much public attention, this car-centric city has already adopted a new policy giving substantial ground to these advocates. By a 12-2 vote, the City Council recently adopted what is called the Mobility Plan 2035, which calls, among other things, for putting many city streets on a “road diet” to allow more room for bicycle lanes and sidewalks. A few […]

When we meet someone for the first time, we immediately start forming impressions of them. It takes a lot to change that perception, even if they turn out to be quite different from the way we initially perceived them. Similarly with conflict. The way in which a controversy is framed does much to affect the way parties subsequently see the dispute. Bombet When a prospective client brings their problem to a lawyer, the lawyer is trained to sift through the client’s story and pick out all of the potential legal claims. Much of the client’s story is irrelevant to the lawyer, even though it may be important to the client. The lawyer then frames the story as an accusation that […]

In a prior post, I suggested that in the absence of a thorough re-vamping of the rules of civil procedure, parties and practitioners should try to invent new ways to resolve disputes outside the court system, How exactly would that work? Let’s start by considering how to open a case, both within and outside the court system. If you’re having a problem with your neighbor/boss/business partner/stranger, etc., you can’t simply ask the court to help you resolve that conflict. Instead you must file a complaint setting forth a cognizable legal claim. You must include all the elements of the claim. You must have damages or an entitlement to equitable relief. You must identify yourself as the victim and the other […]