Conflict Resolution

Advanced Problem-Solving Strategies

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Ryo Oyamada was fatally mowed down by a police car in New York City four years ago. An article in the New York Daily News today reported on the settlement of a family’s suit against the police department for the wrongful death of their son. I was struck by a statement the family is reported to have released explaining their decision to accept the settlement: “Our family feels that there is no way to hold the NYPD accountable through the court system.” It’s sad to hear of a party that feels so defeated by accepting a settlement. I know nothing about this particular case, aside from the scanty details provided in the news article, but it seems unfortunate that the family […]

At the ABA Dispute Resolution Conference, I had a chance to hear a panel of experts from around the world talk about different ways of viewing the mediator’s role in helping achieve a just result for parties using the process. In China, which has a couple of thousands of years of experience using variants of mediation, the mediator’s role in this regard is viewed very differently from the west, where the practice is of relatively recent vintage. There, mediators have the power, even the duty, to make sure that the result accords with legal norms, and can even prescribe a different outcome from one the parties express. In countries such as the UK, Australia, and the US, on the other […]

It’s not enough to suggest that in resolving disputes, we ought to encourage the use of mediation or negotiation or some other techniques that are preferable to a long, drawn-out lawsuit. Litigants often are not comfortable enough with ADR to resort to it as a first method. Mediation for example has developed a reputation as something parties should not normally resort to until the case has been litigated for a time, to provide the parties enough information to make mediation effective, and to give them enough experience with litigation that they will be motivated to want to avoid more of it. But litigation is such an expensive and destructive process that it seems a shame to require parties to suffer […]

The other day, I was trying to explain to another attorney why I’ve grown to dislike the term “litigation,” even though it’s the most commonly-accepted way of describing most of my law practice. I don’t have any objections to filing or defending lawsuits, and I’m also proud to call myself a trial lawyer for those unusual cases that finally make it to trial. But to me, “litigation” connotes a lot of activity in between that is not only wasteful, but actually counter-productive to the goal of resolving the dispute (I’m thinking of discovery disputes in particular, but the impulse to contest everything the other side is saying can arise in almost any procedural situation). This litigious mindset is counter-productive not […]

There is a measure on the March ballot in Los Angeles, Measure S, that would among other things force a two year moratorium on most new big real estate development projects in the city. I’m not going to discuss here the merits of this proposal, even though I have definite opinions on the topic. I’m only going to address how our political and legal processes frame decisions. In this case, instead of allowing a healthy public debate over the scale, density and location of new apartment construction, in which we could consider a range of ideas, and perhaps reach solutions that serve a number of competing interests, this ballot initiative now forces use to choose only whether we are for […]