Conflict Resolution

Advanced Problem-Solving Strategies

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Who would have thought that the new movie, Straight Outta Compton, in addition to its great story and great music, would also contain some great lessons about negotiation? The main lesson being about the dangers of creating a partnership deal that is not fair to all of the participants. According to the movie’s version of events, the leader of the group NWA, Eazy-E, and the manager Jerry Heller, presented the other members with a deal giving them a much smaller share of the profits than Eazy-E was taking. Followers of the school of aggressive negotiation can justify this hard bargain because it was originally Eazy-E’s company and he put up the money to get the band’s first record made, and […]

An entertaining new book on philosophy (who would have thought there could be such a thing) called Plato at the Googleplex, transports Plato to various settings in our modern world, and attempts to show that we are still grappling, or should be grappling, with many of the same problems that Plato addressed in dialogues written more than 2000 years ago. The book’s Plato character makes you wonder whether, for example, Google does a better job of organizing knowledge than the ancient philosophers did, or whether we’ve made any progress in dealing with child rearing or love or figuring out how to live a better life. This “Plato” leads the people who pass for our modern dispensers of wisdom (such as […]

I’ve finally been catching up on the first season of the TV series House of Cards. The hero, House Majority Whip Frank Underwood, played by Kevin Spacey, is a ruthless and cynical politician interested in obtaining power and using it. He repeatedly gets the better of his adversaries by his willingness to resort to lies and tricks, implying that such unscrupulousness is necessary to get ahead in politics, and that those who are unwilling to resort to underhanded tactics are going to be left behind. It’s a popular view of negotiation in general, that successful negotiators need to use trickery and deception to get the better of their adversaries on the other side of the table. The trouble is that […]

I heard a great story tonight from a college professor. Near the beginning of this professor’s course on political philosophy, a student proclaimed that there was no such thing as justice. “I’ve read Nietzsche,” the student said, “and so I know that there is only power. Justice does not exist.” The professor asked the student to give the course a little more time to test his assumptions. “But I’m warning you,” the professor advised. “If you still think the way you do by the end of this semester, you are not going to get a very good grade.” “You can’t do that,” the student said. “Why not?” asked the professor. “Because it’s not fair!” The professor told us how pleased […]

Kenneth Feinberg was the keynote speaker at the SCMA fall conference yesterday, where we presented him with the Cloke‑Millen Peacemaker of the Year Award. Feinberg gave a fascinating talk on the dilemmas involved in allocating compensation to victims of such famous disasters as the BP Gulf Oil spill, the 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon, and the recent shootings in Aurora, Colorado. In each case, Feinberg was largely successful in avoiding protracted litigation and compensating victims relatively quickly, using criteria that he and his team largely had to invent. Even so, few victims of these disasters chose to go to court after taking the route of an established compensation scheme, even when they retained that option. Feinberg […]