Conflict Resolution

Advanced Problem-Solving Strategies

Read The Latest Post

Parties in conflict may face a choice among various processes for conflict resolution–litigation, arbitration, mediation, or some other formal or informal process. Attorneys are accustomed to presenting their clients with this array of options, and explaining the pros and cons of each. But the choice of process may turn out to be less important in many cases than the choice of approach to resolving the conflict. Parties choosing litigation, for example, are likely to enter that process with an adversarial mindset, filing every possible motion, and disputing every assertion made by the other side. This is the way many of us–including myself–were trained to litigate. But litigation can also be conducted with a more cooperative attitude, and nowadays courts tend […]

The ABA Dispute Resolution conference, held this year in New York City, presents an interesting mix of programs on mediation, arbitration, negotiation and collaborative practice. The conference manages to combine these fields, even though the cultures of mediation and arbitration don’t always mesh very well; in fact they sometimes seem like opposites. But practitioners in both fields seem to get along. What they have in common is the desire to avoid litigation. Having a common enemy makes friends of us all. Thus, at one of the panels I attended, in-house counsel acknowledged that they require employees to sign arbitration clauses so that the company can avoid the burden and expense of class action lawsuits. Mediation or arbitration of employment disputes […]

About halfway through the new movie Woman in Gold–which tells the story of Maria Altmann’s lengthy legal battle to recover the famous Klimt painting of her aunt from the Austrian government–the parties try to resolve the dispute by mediation. At the mediation, Altmann (played by Helen Mirren) offers to allow the Austrians to keep the painting if they will only acknowledge that it was stolen property (looted from her family by the Nazis), and pay some amount in compensation. It was a framework for negotiations that most mediators would jump at, because if the framework were accepted by the other side, the only thing left to negotiate would have been the amount of compensation. But the Austrian representative refuses even to consider […]

Attending the 13th International Online Dispute Resolution Forum, being held at Stanford Law School, the first time the conference has taken place in the United States, offers a glimpse into the future of conflict resolution. Ethan Katsch, dubbed the “father” of online dispute resolution, started the day by telling us that while it began as an outgrowth of ADR, ODR is developing into a distinct field with its own expectations, assumptions and values. I think this might be true, but I’m skeptical based on the evidence so far. Online tools are still mostly applied to allow us to conduct traditional litigation, arbitration, mediation, or negotiation, in more efficient ways. As a number of speakers told the group, traditional practitioners are […]

I’ve heard a number of evangelists of the mediation world, most recently Lee Jay Berman in a talk SCMA sponsored this week in San Diego, talk about the seemingly limitless future of the mediation process. That future seems to depend on the public finally becoming more aware of the possibilities of mediation to resolve not only conflicts that have already worked their way through the court system, but also conflicts that have never even made it to court, or that might be unsuitable for court. But right now the public still seems only vaguely aware of mediation’s possibilities. People might have heard of resolving a divorce or other civil dispute out of court, but might still think that mediation is […]