Conflict Resolution

Advanced Problem-Solving Strategies

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I have had the opportunity recently to act as a facilitatator at a couple of the Days of Dialogue events taking place in Los Angeles this year. Taking a contentious topic–the future of policing–that has been debated around the nation in a confrontational fashion, this program demonstrates another way the issue can be addressed. The program brings together police officers, community leaders, students, and other interested and affected residents of the city to sit around small tables exchanging ideas and experiences related to how policing is and should be conducted.

The organizers of these dialogues have promoted them as a starting point for action and change. And it’s certainly legitimate to view the process of listening and trying to understand different perspectives as a first step in helping to craft better policing practices. But the dialogue could also be viewed as an end in itself. The mere fact that people can engage in reflective communication about a divisive issue is what brings about change. By participating in these kinds of dialogues, we have an opportunity to gain some appreciation of the challenges facing police officers. And police officers have an opportunity to gain a better understanding of how they can be viewed sometimes as protectors and sometimes as threats to the community. Biases can be exposed; historical perspectives can be shared. Just by sitting around tables and talking with random people of different views, we may change more attitudes than can happen when opposing factions only shout at and confront each other.

(But see my post on a black lives matter protest I witnessed this summer, where I argued that carefully-staged confrontations can also be effective in changing attitudes. Protest marches may be needed sometimes to call attention to an issue, but constructive dialogue is also needed to help resolve conflict.)