Conflict Resolution

Advanced Problem-Solving Strategies

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In the highly-charged atmosphere of our current political season, is more fighting really what we need? Senator Elizabeth Warren evidently thinks so. Here is a portion of Senator Warren’s comments on the Rachel Maddow show last night, when Warren explained why she is endorsing Hillary Clinton for President:  Hillary Clinton won . . . because she’s a fighter . . . . And I think this is what we need. . .  As a Democrat, one of the things that frustrates me the most is there are a lot of times we just don’t get in the fight. We ask pretty please if we can have things or we make the argument for why it is the best thing to do, […]

Here is how one high stakes negotiation is currently playing out: First a recap. On February 13, 2016, Justice Scalia’s unexpected death created a vacancy on the Supreme Court. Within less than a day, leading Senate Republicans made a pre-emptive opening demand, announcing that they would refuse to consider, even to hold hearings for, any nominee the president proposed.  Next, President Obama announced that he would proceed in the normal course anyway, and he also invited the opposition to the White House, where they meet in the Oval Office on March 1, 2016. Presumably the parties gauged each other’s resolve, presented their respective best alternatives to a negotiated outcome of the dispute, perhaps suggested some ways of reaching a resolution. […]

A variation of the Prisoners’ Dilemma problem may be playing out in the Republican primary campaign. Those elements in the party who are still seeking to prevent Trump from becoming the nominee have apparently abandoned their original tactic of attempting to coalesce support around the strongest non-Trump candidate while encouraging weaker candidates to drop out. Instead, the plan of the Never Trump movement is now to encourage all three remaining candidates to remain in the race, but act more cooperatively toward each other so that each can amass the maximum number of delegates in the states in which each is running most strongly, and thereby prevent Trump from gaining a majority in advance of the convention. Thus, Rubio and Cruz […]

Are there negotiating lessons one can learn from the world of Quentin Tarantino? Mediators tend to believe that if we encourage parties in conflict to continue talking even when resolution seems unlikely, they will eventually reach a level of common understanding that will enable both sides to find an acceptable way out of conflict. Films like The Hateful Eight and most other Tarantino films, severely test that assumption. The characters jabber endlessly. They examine each problem in excruciating detail. They lay out all of the various scenarios for escape from their predicament (their best alternatives to a violent outcome). At one point in The Hateful Eight, a character is jumping to conclusions about which of the three guys lined up against […]

The new Cold War thriller Bridge of Spies, based on the true story of the prisoner exchange for captured U2 pilot Francis Gary Powers, shows an attorney living up to the highest standards of advocacy as well as negotiating ability. The movie’s lawyer-hero, James Donovan (played by Tom Hanks) is first seen as a typical insurance company lawyer making clever legal arguments about whether an accident involving five motorcyclists should be considered a single “incident.” Even when doing that, however, Donovan is able to impress by tying those arguments to a higher purpose. When Donovan is asked to defend accused Russian spy Rudolf Abel, he takes his ethical responsibilities, and his devotion to the Constitution and to his client’s interests, […]

Who would have thought that the new movie, Straight Outta Compton, in addition to its great story and great music, would also contain some great lessons about negotiation? The main lesson being about the dangers of creating a partnership deal that is not fair to all of the participants. According to the movie’s version of events, the leader of the group NWA, Eazy-E, and the manager Jerry Heller, presented the other members with a deal giving them a much smaller share of the profits than Eazy-E was taking. Followers of the school of aggressive negotiation can justify this hard bargain because it was originally Eazy-E’s company and he put up the money to get the band’s first record made, and […]