Conflict Resolution

Advanced Problem-Solving Strategies

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I will be a guest on the Doug Noll radio show on Thursday, February 19, 2015. The program is broadcast over the internet and its website can be found here. In case you miss the program Thursday night, however, I believe it will soon be available on the website. I expect to be talking about the business of mediation, how mediation may be transforming the civil justice system, and whatever else comes to mind. I’m looking forward to the opportunity. UPDATE (3/5/15): It appears the audio file was erased by the web radio station, so my interview is now lost to posterity. Doug promises that we will do another program soon however.

If somebody were to ask me (actually somebody did ask me) about the future of conflict resolution, my answer would have to include technology. Technology is already enabling us to do things that would have been unimaginable only, say, 20 years ago. We now carry devices in our pockets that enable access to virtually any available information. I can tap my cellphone to pinpoint my location on an interactive map and find out instantly how long it will take me to get anywhere by any available mode of transportation; I receive updates on appointments or plane schedules without even asking for them; and I can instantly communicate, via Twitter, or Linkedin or Facebook, or any number of other means, with […]

In an exchange of letters published in the most recent issue of the New York Review of Books, commenting on an article last month about reforming the plea bargaining process by Federal District Judge Jed Rakoff in New York, Judge Rakoff defends his proposal to get judges more involved in plea bargaining by comparing it to the way mediation is offered to civil litigants in the same court. Here is how he describes mediation as he sees it being practiced: [C]ivil litigants regularly meet with magistrate judges or court-appointed mediators shortly after a case is filed and, in separate, confidential presentations to the mediator, describe their respective evidence and positions. The mediator then meets again with the parties separately and, […]

Joint sessions have suddenly shown up as a hot topic again. The fall issue of the ABA Dispute Resolution magazine features an article by Eric Galton and Tracy Allen alarmingly called “Don’t Torch the Joint Session,” which decries the “disturbing trend” of eliminating the joint session from mediation. LA mediator Lynne Bassis has an article in the same issue entitled “Face-to-face Sessions Fade Away.” And New Zealand mediator Geoff Sharp on the Kluwer Mediation Blog has written a piece with the strange title “The Californication of Mediation,” which identifies this disturbing trend as emanating from my home base, the well-developed mediation market of Southern California. Eric Galton has even formed a facebook group called “Save the Mediation Joint Session and Promote Party […]

The city of Detroit emerged from bankruptcy yesterday, a process that was successful because of something the participants labeled the “Grand Bargain.” The Grand Bargain is a complicated plan, but its key feature involves the transfer of the city’s extremely valuable art collection to a charitable trust, in exchange for about $800 million in new financing provided by the state and private parties. It sounds like a clever solution to a difficult problem. What jumped out at me from this morning’s LA Times article, was this comment from bankruptcy professor Laura Bartell describing how the parties managed to hammer out the deal: “When everyone realized the situation, there wasn’t a lot to argue about.” Really? Nothing to argue about? From what I […]

I was interviewed the other day for a possible article on court-ordered mediation. In discussing this topic, it’s hard to avoid talking about such questions as settlement rates in various kinds of programs, or how mediation programs affect the workload of the courts. We are looking for statistical measures of the success of mediation as compared to other means of resolving cases in court (settlement conferences with judges, arbitration, neutral evaluation, lawyer-initiated settlement discussions, disposition by motion, trial, etc.) That also tends to be the way that judges measure the value of court-connected or private mediation programs. We can’t help but wonder which method gives you the most bang for the buck. But those kinds of measures only tell part […]