Conflict Resolution

Advanced Problem-Solving Strategies

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Some interesting back-and-forth occurred during the last panel of the day yesterday at the 2014 ODR conference, when David Bilinsky, a legal practice consultant, described the high tech tools he uses in teaching law students. To oversimplify his presentation, these tools allow students to conduct side discussions during lectures in a chat feature that can be employed either during an online or even an in-person class. The theory is that these side chats can expand on the lecture, and reinforce learning by facilitating more interactive participation. This idea rubbed some people in the room the wrong way, especially those of us who pre-date the online revolution and went to school in the days when teachers constantly told us to stop […]

Attending the 13th International Online Dispute Resolution Forum, being held at Stanford Law School, the first time the conference has taken place in the United States, offers a glimpse into the future of conflict resolution. Ethan Katsch, dubbed the “father” of online dispute resolution, started the day by telling us that while it began as an outgrowth of ADR, ODR is developing into a distinct field with its own expectations, assumptions and values. I think this might be true, but I’m skeptical based on the evidence so far. Online tools are still mostly applied to allow us to conduct traditional litigation, arbitration, mediation, or negotiation, in more efficient ways. As a number of speakers told the group, traditional practitioners are […]

Mediators often describe the process they lead as antithetical to the traditional justice system. I do it myself, sometimes explaining to the participants in a mediation that we do things in mediation the opposite way from court. For example, I might point out that in a courtroom, the judge is the most important person, and arguments in court are directed at the judge; while in mediation the parties are most important, and arguments are directed at each other. Mediators also sometimes try to persuade parties that the process is much better than litigation. Litigation is “bad” because it’s expensive; or because it’s adversarial; or because it produces far from perfect results. Mediation is “good” because it’s consensual; or because it’s […]

While not very impressive grammatically, the statement published today on Tesla’s website that “all our patent are belong to you” might have some earthshaking consequences in the intellectual property world. Tesla has decided that in the interest of developing an electric car market and battery infrastructure, they will no longer bring patent infringement lawsuits against anyone using their electric car technology in good faith. Perhaps there is an element of “save the world” altruism in this gesture, as Tesla claims to be motivated by a desire to get all gasoline-powered vehicles off the road. And Tesla acknowledges that they themselves can’t possibly build enough electric cars to accomplish that goal. But Tesla’s new policy also seems like a remarkable recognition that the […]

Can mediation confidentiality threaten a party’s right to due process? A recent case out of the Central District of California, Milhouse v. Travelers, currently on appeal to the Ninth Circuit, held that the due process rights of a party can override the parties’ agreement, and a state evidentiary rule precluding the admission in any subsequent proceedings of statements made in mediation. The district court allowed an insurance company being accused of bad faith refusal to settle a claim, to introduce evidence of the plaintiffs’ demands made during a mediation, for the purpose of showing that it was the plaintiffs, not the insurance company, who were acting unreasonably. Generally in California mediation confidentiality is treated as sacrosanct. Maybe a little less […]